Why you should buy organic seeds from local small or family owned growers.

Why buy your seed locally? Locally grown seeds are better because:

– The seeds are adapted to regional areas for success
– The seeds attract and feed local pollinators and birds
– The seeds have genetic properties to fight local disease

Why buy from small and family growers? Small and family growers are pledged to strengthen biodiversity.

– 80% of all seeds are grown by 4 mega seed companies
– Small and family growers personally grow and sell certified organic seeds
– Small and family growers insure the survival of Biodiversity of seed sources

Find organic seed companies – small and family owned – read their websites and learn about their histories and mission to provide the gardening communities with organically grown new and heirloom plant varieties – not grown by large corporate companies. Many websites have growing information and offer free downloads of books and recipes. You will meet the people behind the seeds that you plant in your garden.

There are more than 3,000 varieties of heirloom or heritage tomatoes in active cultivation worldwide and more than 15,000 known varieties. More than 42 types of pumpkins are available as well as more than 14 varieties of cucumbers from just one company.

Find the Seed List that best suits your locality, garden and family favorites. Plant something new and it might become a family favorite in the future.

All lists are free and PDF downloads are Free.2019 List – Organic seed companies in USA
2019 List – Organic seed companies in Pacific Northwest and British Columbia (PNW)
2019 List – Organic seed companies in California

Posted in 2019 eCatalogs - Seed Companies, 2019 Seed Companies, Free, PNW | Leave a comment

Easy Peasy Gardening – Lemongrass – Buying and Rooting Stalks

Easy Peasy Gardening – Growing Lemongrass

Fail Proof Directions

About Lemongrass 
            Lemongrass is a very easy to grow herb used in Asian recipes, teas, medicals and skin care products. It is native to Asia, Africa, Australia, and tropical islands, but can be grown anywhere where it can get at least 6 hours of daytime summer sun.

Lemongrass is an attractive plant in the ground or container.

Lemongrass is an attractive plant in the ground or container.

Lemongrass can be found in most large supermarkets, Asian Markets or vegetable stands either loose or wrapped in bunches of 4 – 5 stalks. 4 – 6 stalks is a good number to start.

Lemongrass can be found in most large supermarkets, Asian Markets or vegetable stands.

Lemongrass can be found in most large supermarkets, Asian Markets or vegetable stands.

Some markets will package up several stalks. 4-6 stalks will be a good number to start the project.

Some markets will package up several stalks. 4-6 stalks will be a good number to start.

What to look for:  If possible buy stalks that have sections of root base at the end of the stalk. If the leaves come all the way to the bottom of the stalk, you will have to pull some of the leaves off the stalk.

Two leaves have been peeled off of the stalk.

Two leaves have been peeled off of the stalk. Unroll the leaves to expose the base.

Place the stalks in a glass, jar or vase and place in a sunny
window or bright spot outside.

Stalks can be placed in glass vase on sunny warm deck. In cold weather, a bright window will work as well.

The above photo shows stalks placed in glass vase on sunny warm deck. In cold weather, a bright window will work as well. Place the stalks in a glass, jar or vase and place in a sunny window or bright spot outside. 

In just a few days, roots will start to emerge in the spaces left from the removal of the leaves.
Roots emerging from spaces at end of stalk.

In a few more days and one or two new plants might also form in these spaces. The new plants are usually green and will face up.

Read More in part two ….

Go to: How to plant rooted stalks……..

Download FREE   Complete Directions for Growing Lemongrass

Posted in Accessible-Gardens, Container Gardens, DIY Do It Yourself, Easy, Enabled Gardens, Free, Gardening, Gardening Tips, Herb Gardens, Special Projects | Leave a comment

Easy Peasy Gardening – Growing Lemongrass – Planting in Soil

Easy Peasy Gardening – Growing Lemongrass
Part Two, How to Plant Rooted Stalks.

  • When the stalks have rooted in water, it is time to move them up to individual pots with soil.

  • Any container can be used for planting rooted stalks into soil. Containers must have drainage holes in the bottom of the container.

  • New or reused plastic pots can be used. Yogurt, food containers, bottoms of plastic soda bottles as well as milk cartons also work, don’t forget the drainage holes.

  • Bagged potting soil can be purchased for the new plants, any good quality is fine. Clean, pest free garden soil can also be used.

container half filled with moist soil.

Fill container half way with moistened potting soil, pat down gently to settle soil.

photo showing tiny new plant emerging from end of stalk

Tall new plant ready to move to soil.

This stalk has many new roots and a new plant growing out of the root base. Special care must be taken to plant in soil without damaging new plant.

Wearing gloves while potting plants is always a good idea.

Gloves should be worn while handling all new plants. Gently hold new plant to the side while carefully adding moistened soil.

Photo: How to firmly but gently tap the soil to settle and water- in the new lemongrass plant.

Firmly but gently tap the soil to settle and water- in the new lemongrass plant.

Photo: Several potted-up plants in sun.

Newly potted-up (planted) lemongrass. These will be taken indoors for winter, and placed outside in a sunny location when all chance of frost in over. Some will be placed in large containers, some in the garden and others for friends or sent to a local food bank.

Go back to: How to buy and root lemongrass ……...

Download Free PDF  Complete Directions for Growing Lemongrass

Posted in Accessible-Gardens, Container Gardens, DIY Do It Yourself, Easy, Enabled Gardens, Free, Gardening Tips, Herb Gardens, Special Projects | Leave a comment

Free Halloween Images and Spooky Video

NOT for the faint of heart!

FREE DOWNLOAD – Halloween pictures for scary screensavers or DIY greeting cards.  These images are copyright free; use however you like.

Lighted carved pumpkins and turnip

Three lighted pumpkins and one turnip.

Lighted carved pumpkins at night and one turnip

Lighted carved pumpkins at night and one turnip

Two carved pumpkins, one carved turnip glowing into the night

Two carved pumpkins, one carved turnip glowing into the night

Scary pumpkin face and smiley turnip with candle.

Scary pumpkin face and smiley turnip with candle.

Very close up of spider and wrapped bug in web.

Spider with bug covered with web.

Closeup of spider showing legs and holding bug in web.

Closeup of spider with bug being eaten.

Picture of common garden spider in web.

Spider in web – makes great screensaver.

Picture of spider in web for screensaver. Will keep people away from your computer - very scary.

Close up of garden spider.

Click to start Halloween vide0. (be prepared to check audio volume)

Posted in DIY Do It Yourself, Easy, Free, Halloween | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Easy Peasy Project – Mint Garden

Mint is an herb that has been grown for thousands of years for its medicinal properties, as a soothing tea and as a flavoring for many foods. It roots quickly in water and is easy to grow when planted in soil. It is best to plant in a container because it can become invasive in your garden.

Sources for mint for cuttings, in the grocery store, friends, gardens and nurseries.
This is a picture of a bunch mint stems that have been rooted in a plastic container
Container after 3 weeks in shade with summer heat.
Picture showing many roots after only a few weeks in water.
Roots strike (develop)  in water – ready to plant in soil.
Close up photo showing all the roots on one cutting of mint that have grown in water.
Many roots have formed on this piece of mint after 4 weeks in water.
Photo showing that roots strike along the stem of the mint cutting where it was under water
Roots strike along stem where it was under water

Separate each stem and plant in good potting soil. You can plant several in each container or individually.

Photo showing new plant in pot with gently firmed soil with suggestion to water well.
Gently firm soil around the new plant and water well.
Keep your new plants out of direct hot sun for one week and then gradually – over another week – move the plants to half day full sun for another two weeks and then to full sun. Water containers when they feel dry to touch. If they start to look wilted in full sun, give them an extra drink of water. Trimming the tops of the plants will encourage side branching. It is safe to harvest a few leaves from the little plants immediately but just two or three leaves to start. Pinch or cut the tip of the plant just above a leaf node. Download free PDF  for easy to follow illustrated directions for successfully creating your mint garden.  
Posted in Accessible, Better Gardening, Container Gardens, DIY Do It Yourself, Easy, Gardening Tips, Herb Gardens | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments